Category: Consumer

The Best Photography Kit

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Is there such a thing as the best camera or perfect lens?

Maybe for some, but for most you will find that no camera and lens will provide you with what you want. Many professional or enthusiast photographers and videographers would have experienced the question that always seems to be unanswerable when asked by a friend or family member.

The question that typically gets asked is…

What is the best camera or lens to get?

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You have to admit it is a valid question, but really it is a hard one to answer. In order to attempt at answering the ‘how long is a piece of string’ question, you have to ask a question rather than an answer. Here’s a good example:

What are you intending to take photos of and what would you like to do with the photos after you have captured them?

It is the final response that will determine what the best camera for them will be.

Technology does play a part in the solution, though, and it is one of those things that will always develop over time. A good example of this is when you look back 10 years, when the Fujifilm Finepix S5 Pro was released on September 25th, 2006. Back then 6 megapixels was amazing and a frame rate of 1.6 frames per second seemed incredible. This to many at the time was a leap in the right direction. The specifications and skin tones produced by the camera seemed very adequate for most portrait and wedding photographers, but for those who required a fast frame rate, like sports photographers it just wasn’t enough.

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Fast forward to Fujifilm’s recent X-T2 release and the image quality jumped four times to 24 megapixels while the frame rate increased to 14 frames with the electronic shutter. Now, clearly, with the increased frame rate and megapixels this should be enough to cater for the portrait, wedding and sports photographers out there.

Some will agree with this and others might not. That’s the thing when making a camera – you can never cater for every user out there. Instead, Fujifilm goes the step further to try and provide cameras based on user feedback in response to the questions above. It’s certainly not everyone but it’s the vast majority.

Part of what being a photographer and videographer is all about is learning how to use the equipment to get the best results – despite the specifications.

So, if someone were to ask you – what is the best camera or lens to get – the first reply should always be what are you intending to photograph and use it for?

Based on this information you will be able to guide them with the correct camera and lens combination that will suit their needs. This is why we recommend you visit a camera store, because unlike online where the prices may seem better – you can never put a price on the excellent knowledge and service provided by an expert.

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To help you with your decisions while you read this, a free PDF buying guide has been provided in case you have any questions about the current range of Fujifilm cameras (a lens guide is also in the making). In the guide, we take you through each available model, including the new Fujifilm X-T2 and attempt to best describe whom the camera would be good for in a real world situation.

Once you have read through the magazine styled pages, we encourage you to visit our store locator (if you are in Australia) to find the nearest Fujifilm X Stockist where you can ask questions and get a direct response from an expert. On top of this if you are unable to visit a store we encourage you to call us directly on 1800 226 355 and choose option 4, where an expert from our Fujifilm X Series digital help desk will be able to assist.

Lastly, if you own a Fujifilm X Series camera, tell us why you choose your camera and how it best suits your needs. We would love the feedback!

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Lightweight landscape photography with a reportage head

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By CAMILLE MCMILLAN

Epic mountains.
Granite walls clung to by a finger…
Night sleeping in a hammock hung by Carabiners on a vertical 500m drops.
Scaling a waterfall turned to ice in -10 conditions, Ice axes, crampons.
The north face of the Eiger.
Base jumping.
No, no thanks, not for me…

I live in and love the mountains, the French Pyrenees. I am very happy to climb , walk and explore, but when the need for Carabiners and ropes happen, that’s when I take another route. I’m not an Alpinist, this makes me a lightweight, and as I’m a lightweight I wish to carry lightweight kit. No “Landscape photographers bad back” for me.

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Recently I took a trip to the other side of France, the Alpes-Maritimes, tracing the old border of France and Italy. A border that shifted with the end of WW2. The old border line in the Alpes-Maritimes are on ridges, peaks or cols, sometimes on the road, but mostly the car can only get you so far, then its hiking.

I approach landscape photography with a reportage head. I am not the kind of photographer that has the patients or time to hang around at a location, ponder, wait for the light, pause for dusk or sleep out all night for dawn. Maybe I’m not a proper landscape photographer, maybe I just lack the patience, I am however very much interested in narrative, the Journey.

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When on my journey, I see something, I stop and take a picture and move on. Hopefully the light is good on the subject at that moment. I’m much more about the story. That’s where the X100T is so good. I see the work I’m doing now as a journal, making notes. Maybe some day I could return with more equipment (a tripod ) maybe even camp out the night , but only with light kit, keeping the no humping kit bad back rule.

I shoot jpegs now (I spoke about in my last entry) and I’m right back to my early E6 (transparency film) days, I bracket. A few years ago I would have scoffed at the idea of bracketing and would have been horrified that I am shooting jpegs.

The f-stop bracketing with the X100T is great, 1/3rd of a stop work really well. This is not ‘in camera ‘ processing for a bracket, its a true 3 exposure event. I struggled with this at first as I would start to move looking for the next picture before the 3rd shot had fired. I am learning to be patient.

For me its important to know which in film simulation to use and not just shoot with the very seductive Classic Crome or the old school landscape photographers favourite Velvia (Even if you can shoot it at 800 ASA !) You can bracket film simulation modes with the X100T, and it is a one exposure event. Film simulation bracketing is a very good learning tool on how the different film simulations will look in different lights, however you can not Film simulation bracket and f-stop bracket at the same time. In my opinion, the characteristics of the film stock very much influences how the story is read. I make the decision which film simulation to use on a project and keep it that way. Sometimes the film simulation I have chosen is not the best for the light in a situation, but I feel the continuity of the colour and tonal range is of an over riding importance. Okay, you can call me old school.

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I’m not the photographer that enjoys the capture one / light-room / photoshop part of photography. I just want to get the image correct in camera and then print it. The dream is to send it to the printer from in the field…

I should however invest in an ND grad filter, Seven 5 by Lee filter probably and the WCL-X100 wide conversion lens, a pro ipad and a carbon tripod.

I’m searching for perfection in camera and escape the tyranny of post production.


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