Category: Tutorials

How to: Make Better Images Indoors

Here in Europe, you can already feel it… Winter season is here. The days are getting shorter, it is getting colder outside, and in some parts it is already starting to snow. Of course, such conditions create perfect outdoor sceneries to capture in your photos, but shooting portraits and other pictures involving people or pets might be challenging due to the unpredictable weather. Therefore, it is time to move back inside and make use of the cozy vibes of our homes. Especially, since Christmas is around the corner, and we are about to take the perfect cheesy family pictures. For beautiful indoor images with perfect color, you need to know how to respond to available light.

Remember, what you see is what you get!

Utilizing your camera’s electronic viewfinder, or the main LCD screen, gives you an accurate view of how the picture will be when you hit the shutter, eliminating any kind of guesswork. Even if you make adjustments to exposure or other settings, you are able to see these in your viewfinder. Thus, you get the picture exactly the way you want to.

Did you know if you add a live histogram to the display, it shows how bright or dark the image you will make is? In your camera’s settings, simply go to ‘screen set-up > display custom setting > activate histogram’.

Make use of auto ISO

As always, available light is inconsistent and therefore, it is important to be adjustable. ISO is every photographer’s secret for that! For everyone who is lazy or as we like to call it ‘smart’, simply set the ISO to Auto, so it adjusts automatically, ensuring you get a good exposure every time. If you prefer adjusting the ISO to your specific requirements, you can as well do so manually by altering the ISO handle.

In addition, you can set a minimum shutter speed with the Auto ISO. Now, it will not drop below that setting – as you can see, all you need to do is tell the camera to do what you want it to do! By choosing one of the auto ISO modes you will be able to change the three settings ‘Default Sensitivity, Max Sensitivity and Min. Shutter Speed’.

Significant to note is that control over Auto ISO is only available in the Program, Aperture Priority, Shutter Priority, or Manual modes. In other options, the camera uses Auto ISO automatically.

How to: Creating Light Painting

You might have seen it a few times already, but probably not under its correct name… We are talking about light painting, or also called light drawing. Most of us are familiar with the term and photo technique ‘long exposure’ (longer exposure time). Light painting is a form of long exposure, but brings it to the next level whilst creating an art piece that looks like it has been drawn even though it was taken with a camera.

Terry Hall with FUJIFILM X-T2 + XF16-55mmF2.8 R LM WR – F18, ISO 200, 10.0 sec

Light Painting

We all have seen those stunning images of streets where streetlights or headlights on cars become trails and melt together, creating something special without seeing the actual vehicle. This unique effect in cityscape images can be created while shooting at night or in low light with longer exposure times. Of course, this is nothing new, but creating and sketching scenes and photographs specifically to use the unique effect of long exposure to create something similar to a painting is referred to as “light painting”. Photographers are specifically looking for a moving light source such as a candle, flashlight, LED lights or another light source, aiming to alter an image while using long exposure. Thus, light-painters not only take the picture as-is instead add another element by highlighting a subject, creating trails of light, flashes, and other special elements like these.

How to: Create the perfect vacation photos

Summer is probably the favorite season for the majority of us since it is holiday season. Here at Fujifilm everyone is taking a break lately to recharge their batteries and enjoy the summer with family, friends or just by themselves. Most of us love to take time off to get out of the city, country, or even continent to explore new locations and get a change of scenery. Of course, those moments, and everything we get to see and experience on those journeys, should be captured and saved as memories. Therefore, we want to show you how to capture perfect vacation photos to make your trip literally unforgettable. Here are a few things you need to know for your next vacation trip:

Wider Scenes

Usually, it is all about setting the scene, and telling the story of your vacation is no different. We all know the moment when we are travelling from an out-of-town airport to the hotel and want to catch the first glimpse of the city skyline. On a hiking vacation, in a situation where you are preparing for the ascent of a mountain, make an image of the peak’s awesome majesty. These pictures taken at that moment will preserve the feeling of excitement at the adventure that lies ahead.

Photo © Afton Almaraz

Details

Wider scene setting images are great and stunning to look at, but if that is all you see, it can feel a little impersonal. Therefore, making images focusing on the details which give an area its character are important to consider and are captivating too. Details can come in a variety of forms. As unique architectural design, exotic plants and flowers, food, shapes, or anything that stands out to you.

Culture

Photo © Braden Gunem

Culture and the cultural shock experienced while travelling is probably the reason #1 we love to visit other countries and destinations. Subsequently, the best place to start is where culture itself starts: the local people. Look for any unique practices that interest you, from day-to-day life, such as local dress, food, or modes of transport, to deeply important customs and rituals such as commemoration, worship or social etiquette. However, it is extremely essential to be respectful when photographing local people because you do not want to offend or molest them. Check what is culturally acceptable and what is not beforehand, or simply ask for permission before raising your camera in front of their eyes.

Personal Experience

Capturing all the unique elements that shapes your destination is one important part, but we cannot forget what makes your trip special. It is essential to capture your own experiences as well. Tell the story from your perspective: your preparation for the trip with an image of your packed bags at home before you leave; memorialize afternoons at the beach bar with images of the waiter mixing your favorite drink; or remember the vehicle and driver that took you on a nail-biting journey between mountain villages. Most important, take photos of yourself having fun!

Photo © Braden Gunem

Remember it is all about emotions which make your story and that always begins with YOU. Do not feel like you need to make a picture, make it because you want to keep this moment forever.

Keep your memories forever – store them in a photo album

In order to keep your memories forever and with high quality, our MyFujifilm photo albums are perfect to store your pictures. Hard cover, soft cover, large, small, etc. we offer a variety of options fitting your personal needs.

How to: Capture Better Travel Portraits

Walking through the streets of Paris, Barcelona, Rome or just taking a stroll along the promenade of Dubrovnik, Croatia. Traveling through different countries, cities, and cultures is probably something we all love. Slowly our lives are turning back to a more routine and less restrictive daily life. Thus also travel becomes possible again. Spring season is in full swing too and many people are ready to travel to different locations and countries again to admire and capture special sceneries. To get pleasing results, we have some helpful tips to make your memories unforgettable.

People are the heart of any culture, so when you journey to other countries or cities, you will find travel gold in their faces and the way they live. Street portraits and candids are two different types to capture those moments. While shooting a candid, your subject is likely to be unaware, or at least unconcerned, of your presence. Portraits are more likely to be posed, and will perhaps include eye contact, with the subject fully aware they’re being photographed. Consequently, some tricks are important to keep in mind…