Tag: mammography

When and Who should have Mammography Screening

Breast cancer is an enemy that can be tackled by anticipating it with healthy lifestyles and without letting your guard down thanks to screening. Mammography is crucial in the prevention of breast cancer, which is the most common cancer disease in the female population. Thanks to early diagnosis and effective treatment, the survival of women with breast cancer has improved, with mortality significantly reduced and estimated 5-year survival increasing.

10 useful tips before mammography screening

Screening for breast cancer is aimed at women between the ages of 45 and 74 (https://healthcare-quality.jrc.ec.europa.eu/ecibc/european-breast-cancer-guidelines/screening-ages-and-frequencies) and involves having a mammogram every two or three years, depending on the age group. *

So here is a list of some good practices to keep in mind when we want to join the screening programme:

  • Respect the timing of mammography screening according to age and any family predispositions
  • Always talk to the family doctor or a specialist first to get all the information about the examination and the centres where it can be carried out
  • Anxiety and fear are often uncomfortable companions on this journey of prevention. However, if the examination requires further investigation, early screening and early diagnosis are the allies that can make the difference in the course of treatment.
  • Do not procrastinate: therefore write down on your calendar the day and time when you want to have the screening examination in order to have a high probability of booking the examination without procrastination
  • On the day of the examination, do not apply deodorants or creams to your skin, as these may alter the image of the mammogram
  • Try to relax; discomfort has been shown to increase a negative psychological state
  • The doctor is a trustworthy person with whom you can talk and share your anxieties and fears.
  • In the case of breast implants, let them know when you book: the centre will be able to tell you if they can perform the examination or refer you to another specialised centre
  • Always go to centres that have the latest generation of equipment, which is more reliable and emits less radiation
  • Carefully keep your screening records and reports to bring with you to each subsequent medical check-up as the information may be crucial for comparison

*This information is based on European guidelines, check with your doctor the screening programmes are in your country.

How is breast cancer screening done?

Mammography, from a technical point of view, is a radiological examination of the breast that allows early detection of tumours in that part of the body because it is able to detect lumps, even small ones, that are not yet perceptible to the touch. So monthly breast self-examination is a good practice, but it cannot replace mammography screening for women covered by this programme.

It is precisely these organised screening programmes that require the examination to be performed by visualising the breast both top-down and sideways. Greater accuracy in diagnosis is achieved by the evaluation of mammography performed separately by two radiologist physicians.

A positive mammogram is not the same as a definite diagnosis of breast cancer, although it does indicate an increased likelihood of being affected by the disease.

This is why, in the event of a suspicion, the first examination is followed by further diagnostic tests that, again within organised screening programmes, consist of a second mammogram, an ultrasound scan and a clinical examination. These examinations may also be followed by a biopsy to assess the characteristics of any cancer cells. Only upon completion of this pathway is a definite medical response obtained and a course of treatment promptly initiated.

Women4Women

women4women - take care of yourself

What happens when your colleague tells you about the importance of breast cancer prevention and manages to get you hooked on her story? Thus WOMEN4WOMEN was born – the magazine written by women who work at Fujifilm every day to spread the technology and culture of breast cancer prevention. This work is dedicated to all women so that they never let their guard down and take care of themselves.

We dedicate the first edition of our magazine to you – no matter if man or woman, so you can become passionate about reading intense and exciting stories and look at technology as a fundamental aid in the fight against breast cancer, too.

For  this year´s Pink October, we have asked colleagues from the Medical Systems field across EMEA to share their experiences and become our ambassadors. Expect to meet biomedic engineers, radiologists, scientists, electronic engineers, industrial chemistry scientists, business and marketing managers, and physicians.

While collecting their stories, we were thrilled about how personal and professional experience can have such a positive influence on the result of their work. Being focused on women who offer their experiences, this approach might look like it is relevant for women only. But we can surely say that breast cancer is a disease that every gender should be aware of.

In case you got curious, feel free to follow the link to the magazine.