Category: Interviews

From Fujifilm staff members to users of Fujifilm cameras, the Interviews sections covers a wide range of subjects.

AT YOUR SERVICE – Anika Sand

Anika Sand, Application Specialist for Fujifilm Germany’s Medical Systems division, servicing hospitals in Germany, shares her experience and feelings during the Coronavirus pandemic. Due to the rapid developments of the Corona situation, we would like to point out that we conducted the interview in 2020.

– We are at your service. During the current Coronavirus pandemic our technicians and application specialists are working on the front line alongside healthcare professionals to make sure patients can be diagnosed and treated. These are their stories. –

Fujifilm: When the Coronavirus pandemic reached Germany, what were your first thoughts?
Anika Sand: At the beginning, when Corona reached Germany, I was probably concerned about whether and how the pandemic would affect my work – not only for Fujifilm but especially for doctors, nurses and patients. The facilities, like hospitals or doctor’s practices, had to prepare for the situation within a short time. Life outside of hospitals also became more difficult for everyone.

Fujifilm: We would like to get to know you better. You are Application Specialist for Radiography for Fujifilm in Germany. Can you describe your role?
Anika Sand: My job is to look after our customers immediately after installation of our Medical Systems on site. I do the briefings with the operating staff, set up the software according to the customer’s wishes and needs. Also, I change the image processing in cooperation with the doctors, if this is desired. At Fujifilm, we work as one team, so I accompany demos to support my sales colleagues, too.

Fujifilm: What motivates you to go to work every day?
Anika Sand: I have been working for Fujifilm for almost 7 years now. Previously, I had worked as an MTA in a radiology practice and was looking for a new challenge. At Fujifilm, I never have the feeling of “stopping” due to our extensive product portfolio and the constant new developments. I look after our digital X-ray systems, mobile and portable radiography solutions, the field of mammography and our CT. Naturally, during COVID-19 we have experienced a shift in demand, especially of our mobile X-ray devices. So, the customers I look after are mixed. This can range from a radiological, gynecological or surgical practice to a university clinic. It can be very enriching to work with customers and being able to show the latest technology to them.

Fujifilm: How do you support the hospitals, doctors and nurses in the current situation?
Anika Sand: During this time, our workload has increased because appointments on site must be carefully planned and prepared. Overnight stays in hotels have also become more difficult, since the rules for protection must also be observed there. My actual job I do the same way as before. Only the “how” has changed – and it has changed a lot. The support is not much different either. Certainly you need to do certain things by phone or online, but working directly with customers usually would be the most efficient way of working – interaction is easier and more direct, you can explain and show face-to-face. I still can, and need to, go to the clinics for my work. I am responsible for radiology operation working smoothly on our devices, regardless of whether it is about the operation or the setting of the images.

“I have hoped from the start that we as society overcome this crisis and everyone can quickly get back to “normal” while learning from this experience.”


Fujifilm: What has changed on site – in hospitals and doctor’s practices – for you?
Anika Sand: I always have a facemask or face covering with me. I also bring disinfectant with me, but it is available at the customer’s sites in all departments. Even before COVID-19, the entrances to the clinics were equipped with disinfectant dispensers. It is good to experience well-managed crisis management in hospitals with all German clinics that I have worked with being well prepared. However, the uncertainty about what the future holds is there. In the meantime, however, the clinics are back in relatively normal operation, which until recently had been severely shut down. I feel safe working at home and at hospital appointments. And for sure, working with a facemask is necessary and can be lifesaving, but is a bit difficult because the air underneath gets quite thin after a lot of talking. A “regular” workday therefore can get quite exhausting.

Fujifilm: What has changed at home and at work?
Anika Sand: Not that much has changed for me. I would normally work at home. So, this is nothing new for my partner and me. At work the situation is very different though. Personal meetings and training cannot take place. Nevertheless, the team has worked out how to exchange information in the home office via regular web meetings to keep everything going as best as possible.

Fujifilm: What have you learned during your recent work in the Coronavirus pandemic?
Anika Sand: My job includes a lot of travelling; I often need to be on site with the doctors and nurses to support them as best as possible. Therefore, possibilities of travelling and overnight stays are heavily necessary to do my job. At the beginning the problem was that many hotels and all restaurants had to close and it was difficult to find something to stay overnight let alone find something to eat after a whole day of work. It was good to experience that problems can be seen as challenges and big and small ones can often be solved according to rules and thinking creatively at the same time. For example, a colleague and I simply had a socially distanced picnic at our hotel one evening. I have hoped from the start that we as society overcome this crisis and everyone can quickly get back to “normal” while learning from this experience.

To download the interview in our Whitepaper format (pdf) please have a look at our AT YOUR SERVICE homepage here.

Women4Women

women4women - take care of yourself

What happens when your colleague tells you about the importance of breast cancer prevention and manages to get you hooked on her story? Thus WOMEN4WOMEN was born – the magazine written by women who work at Fujifilm every day to spread the technology and culture of breast cancer prevention. This work is dedicated to all women so that they never let their guard down and take care of themselves.

We dedicate the first edition of our magazine to you – no matter if man or woman, so you can become passionate about reading intense and exciting stories and look at technology as a fundamental aid in the fight against breast cancer, too.

For  this year´s Pink October, we have asked colleagues from the Medical Systems field across EMEA to share their experiences and become our ambassadors. Expect to meet biomedic engineers, radiologists, scientists, electronic engineers, industrial chemistry scientists, business and marketing managers, and physicians.

While collecting their stories, we were thrilled about how personal and professional experience can have such a positive influence on the result of their work. Being focused on women who offer their experiences, this approach might look like it is relevant for women only. But we can surely say that breast cancer is a disease that every gender should be aware of.

In case you got curious, feel free to follow the link to the magazine.

AT YOUR SERVICE – Back then and today

Fujifilm: At your service Video

– We are at your service. During the current Coronavirus pandemic, our technicians and application specialists are working on the front line alongside healthcare professionals to make sure patients can be diagnosed and treated. Today, Fujifilm looks back at decades of research and development to make this – today’s support – possible. –

Fujifilm has the possibility to support healthcare workers, doctors and patients during the current coronavirus crisis. Our colleagues have adapted to the new situation quickly to enable service and support for those who need it most during the pandemic. This approach might seem new to a few of our readers, but is actually more than 80 years old to us as the Fujifilm family. 

Fujifilm was founded in 1934, back then named Fuji Photo Film Co. Lt., and only two years later, we already launched our first x-ray films. They have been our start in a long history of caring for people’s health. Have a look at this video for a few Fujifilm milestones in the healthcare field: 

Due to the novel coronavirus emergency and the character of the COVID-19 disease, affecting the human lung especially heavily, x-ray is in focus in 2020. – Sadly, not primarily for the 125 year anniversary of Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen’s discovery of x-rays, but due to a critical new disease putting the world into crisis mode and people’s health at great risk. 

Our decades of research, development, and pursuing strategic cooperations, have now put us in a position to offer support to the healthcare sector across the entire spectrum of patient care, ranging from prevention to diagnostics and therapy solutions. 

Now, digitisation is driving us to create value from innovation; growing alongside the needs of the hospitals and doctors caring for you, we have been working in the field of medical IT and medical AI. We are grateful this approach has made it possible lately to support European hospitals, like the ASST Vimercate Hospital in Italy, to efficiently set up a system to assist healthcare professionals to manage the large number of COVID patients. 

Please visit our TAKE AWAY LIBRARY and check out Number 17 REiLI USER’S VOICE or read our latest article on ASST Vimercate Hospital to learn more about how REiLI can support hospitals in times of COVID-19.

We have always learned and evolved, enabling our technology and our colleagues to be at your service. Growing, to serve the health of society – back then, today and in the future.

AT YOUR SERVICE – Francesco Galvani

Francesco Galvani, Medical Equipments Application Engineer, servicing hospitals in north Italy, tells his experience and feelings during the pandemic.

– We are at your service. During the current healthcare crisis our technicians are working on the front lines alongside healthcare professionals to make sure patients can be diagnosed and treated. These are their stories. This series will be updated weekly.

We are in the field every day, in contact with operators and often with patients. We are completely aware of being at risk of infection, something we think about every time we go to a hospital to carry out our tasks. Sometimes, though it is rare, we hear of a possible case of Meningitis or THX, or another disease.

Today’s risk is COVID-19. Right now, COVID-19 is the biggest threat to us all, and we face the possibility of being infected, even if not by direct contact, daily.

Of course, we follow relevant safety procedures, such as wearing masks, gloves and gowns, but only now have these “normal” procedures become fundamental. We are more careful when following these procedures in order to protect ourselves and our safety.

In some situations, such as in Alessandria where the hospital has been entirely dedicated to the Coronavirus emergency, it is easier to implement safety and security measures. The main entrance is closed; the hospital is accessible only through a secondary door. There, they asked me to identify myself. I was on the approved entry list, yet they continued to test my temperature and, as an additional measure, there was someone waiting to “escort” me to a room they had ready and prepared, ensuring that I could educate the operators safely.

When visiting a larger hospital, like Policlinico or San Raffaele, unfortunately you cannot control access across all visitors in the same way. It is not possible to have a designated escort for everyone who enters and leaves the hospital. In these larger hospitals, there are not only patients infected with COVID-19 – there are other patients there, too, with an already weakened immune system. They are the first ones we must protect; they are in the hospital to receive lifesaving treatment, not to become more unwell.

When talking with others, such as operators, doctors and health management, anxiety can begin to overwhelm you. You see the tiredness of those working 10-12 hour shifts each day, and you feel their tension; tension that stays with you even when you are home where your family is waiting for you. They are the first ones you, personally, need to protect, and this worry and way of thinking will not simply disappear on July 30 when the national emergency ends. We must protect them every day, all year round, because the risk of COVID-19 will remain, even though it will be less prominent than it is today.

On February 22, I read a headline that made the virus very real for me: “First case in Milan: 78-year-old hospitalised at San Raffaele”. I had been at that hospital just a few days before, and I had been in several departments. Of course, I could very well not have come into contact with this specific patient, but the 50/50 possibility that I could have was what I thought about the most.

As a first step, I immediately tried to understand what I needed to do. I tried to contact the emergency services at 112, who were in total chaos. In the end, I managed to speak with my family doctor. Nobody knew what to do, nobody knew anything, we were unprepared… and it was only the beginning.